Daily readings about people, places, and events in American history.
Having trouble viewing this email? View the web version.
December 7th
Pearl Harbor
Sunday, December 7, 1941, began as a serene morning at the U.S. Navy base on the island of Oahu in Hawaii. The warships of America’s Pacific Fleet rested at anchor. Many sailors were preparing for church or relaxing, and all was quiet at Pearl Harbor.

At about 7:55 a.m. a buzz from the sky broke the calm as a dive-bomber bearing the red symbol of the Rising Sun of Japan dropped out of the clouds. Seconds later, a swarm of Japanese warplanes followed. Sirens wailed as explosions sounded across the harbor and black smoke poured into the sky.

American sailors scrambled to battle stations while the Japanese planes screamed in for the kill. The main targets were several huge battleships moored in the harbor. Antiaircraft guns roared to life, but they did little good. Bombs and torpedoes hit ship after ship: the Arizona, the Oklahoma, the California, the West Virginia, the Utah, the Maryland, the Pennsylvania, the Tennessee, the  Nevada.

Sailors fought to save their ships, their comrades, and their own lives. Much of the California’s crew abandoned ship after flames engulfed its stern. When the captain determined the battleship might be saved, Yeoman Durrell Conner hoisted the American flag from the stern. At the sight of the colors, the sailors returned to fight the fires and keep her afloat.

Despite such heroism, the attack reduced much of the fleet to smoldering wreckage. The Japanese planes disappeared into the sky, leaving 2,400 dead, 1,200 wounded, and 18 ships and more than 300 American planes destroyed or damaged.

News of the disaster left Americans stunned, but not for long. A remark attributed to Japanese admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, who planned the attack, sums up the result of Pearl Harbor: “I fear we have awakened a sleeping giant and instilled in him a terrible resolve.”

American History Parade
1787
Delaware becomes the first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

1805
Lewis and Clark camp near the mouth of the Columbia River at a site that becomes Fort Clatsop, their winter quarters.

1917
During World War I, the United States declares war on Austria-Hungary.

1941
Japanese warplanes attack the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor.

1963
An instant replay is shown on U.S. TV for the first time after a touchdown during an Army-Navy football game, prompting the announcer to scream, “This is a videotape! They did not score again! They did not score again!”
This content is courtesy of The American Patriot's Almanac
© 2008, 2010 by William J. Bennett and John T.E. Cribb
SUBSCRIPTION INFO

This newsletter is never sent unsolicited. It is only sent to people who signed on the Salem National network OR a friend might have forwarded it to you. We respect and value your time and privacy.

Update your Email Preferences or UNSUBSCRIBE from the American Patriot's Daily Almanac.

OR Send postal mail to:
American Patriot's Daily Almanac Unsubscribe
6400 N. Belt Line Rd., Suite 200, Irving, TX 75063

Were you forwarded this edition of the America Patriot's Daily Almanac?
You can get your own free subscription by clicking here

Copyright © 2022 Salem National, Salem Media Group and its Content Providers.
All rights reserved.
[-OPEN_PIXEL_HERE-]